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Good Clean Fun – Michael Nesmith Monkees Tribute

April 2, 2011 by  
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Another Audacity experiment in Mono. It’s a Michael Nesmith track from one of the later Monkees albums.

Little Darlin’- The Monkees

April 2, 2011 by  
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Another clip from 33 1/3 Revolutions Per Monkee. I would just like to clear something up for the record. From things I have read online, there has been a lot of disregard for this 50’s part of the film and how it was thought as disrespect for the 50’s. Well in the commentary, Micky Dolenz was saying how much respect he had for the 50’s and how much it was a treat for him to be filming this part with all these legends and classic songs. So yeah. Btw i have no idea what davy is doing with his arms or who he’s trying to impersonate.

The Monkees – Words

April 2, 2011 by  
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PLEASE NOTE: I divided my uploads between multiple channels, Bookmark this link in your browser for instant access to an index with links to all of John1948’s oldies classics. LINK: tinyurl.com Unlike most bands of the time, the Monkees were not formed by its members, but rather by TV producers: they were a fictional band in the TV show of the same name. TV producers, Bert Schneider and Bob Rafelson, formulated an idea for a show about a Beatles-like band, then put ads in newspapers, seeking musicians to star in the series. The band was composed of Mike Nesmith, Mickey Dolenz, Davy Jones, and Peter Tork. All the members had some musical experience. The show debuted on NBC in 1966 and became a huge hit. Each week the group would sing a song or two written by top industry names like Carole King, Neil Diamond and Gerry Goffin, while instrumentation was provided by talented musicians, including Stephen Stills and Harry Nilsson. The Monkees’ principle audience consisted of young teenagers and children. Nonetheless singles like ‘I’m a Believer’ became Top 10 hits, and the ‘Prefab Four’ became media icons. By 1967 the Monkees were perhaps the most popular band in the US. But the Monkees themselves grew upset at not being able to play their own instruments or write their own songs, and began to rebel against their producers and record company. The Monkees began playing some of their instruments and writing some songs on 1967’s ‘Headquarters’. That year they embarked on a major

The Monkees – Mr. Webster

April 2, 2011 by  
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This is a Monkees’ song off of their third album: Headquaters. The song is the story of a banker who gets no respect and decides to take the respect he deserves from his boss. I hope you enjoy, tell me what you think. **Sorry about some bad quality sound – this was taken from a forty year old record that has seen better days**

The Monkees Letter Campaign

April 2, 2011 by  
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Please print out, sign and send the following letter. Pass this around to other people while you’re at it. Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Foundation 1290 Avenue of the Americas New York, NY 10104 To Whom It May Concern, I am contacting you on the grave matter of the Monkees’ induction into the Rock N’ Roll Hall of Fame, or rather, the lack thereof. It has always been of my understanding that an artist can be inducted into the Hall of Fame twenty-five years after the release of a debut album, and for outstanding contributions to the musical genre rock n’ roll. My question is, then; where are the Monkees? Many artists, too many to name here, have been inducted having fewer accolades than the Monkees. How many outsold Elvis and the Beatles in their debut year? How many had simultaneous number one chart-toppers in the US and the UK? Only five others have ever achieved the task….and all the ones who have had albums out for twenty-five years are inductees into the Hall of Fame. They were one of the first groups to use a Moog Synthesizer on an album, achieving the task a full two years before the Beatles did it on Abbey Road and a few months before The Notorious Byrd Brothers album by the Byrds. They had the top grossing tour of 1986 for their twenty year reunion tour. Their album More of The Monkees is the twelfth biggest selling album of all time, and they released four number one albums in a one year span. To use a New York Post article from 2007 which quoted Peter Tork, some

Monkees Valleri Mono Version

April 2, 2011 by  
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A video I did up to the mono version of the Monkees song “Valleri” which is on their Birds, Bees And Monkees album. As you can see I used clips from the ep where Peter falls in love with a girl named Valleri who has an uppity boyfriend. This song would’ve been great in that ep but they hadn’t recorded it yet. Still, Forget That Girl was a nice song in that ep. This video is dedicated to the late Tommy Boyce, the late John Lennon and the lateGeorge Harrison. Amen. As always my videos are in tribute to my late husband Mike Harrell. I love you. Amen. Copyright Disclaimer Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for “fair use” for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair use. Video is done for fun and not for profit. No copyright infringement intended. All copyrights belong to their owners. “

Davy Jones from The Monkees-The O’Reilly Factor-Bill OReilly

April 2, 2011 by  
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Davy Jones of The Monkees sits down with Bill O’Reilly on The O’Reilly Factor to discuss Jann Wenner and the Rock and Rock Hall of Fame Contraversy.

Daydream Believer: Literal Video Version

April 2, 2011 by  
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Ever wish songs just sang what was happening in the music video? Well now they do, in my first-ever continuation of Dusto McNeato’s “literal video” concept! Lyrics/singing: DASjr 2/28/09 Featured on POPTUB 3/27/09: www.youtube.com Aired on ABC’s “Nightline”!!! 08/18/09: abcnews.go.com

Peter Tork and Davy Jones Come to Blows

April 2, 2011 by  
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As The Monkees fought for creative control of their music, tensions began to mount and tempers raged out of control leading to a few “punch-ups”.